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daniel guzmán, the man who should be dead, but rose to another life, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2020

daniel guzmán, the man who should be dead, but rose to another life, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2020

daniel guzmán, the man who should be dead, but rose to another life, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2020

daniel guzmán, the man who should be dead, but rose to another life, kurimanzutto, mexico city, 2020

the man who should be dead, but rose to another life

Daniel Guzmán's series, The man who should be dead but rose to another life (2018), is the amalgamation of various interests that construct his visual universe. From a pre-Hispanic worldview, their gods and rituals, the Spanish conquest, sci-fi cinema, to the gnostic darkness of Alien and the helmet of Darth Vader, to the texts of Philip K. Dick, John Gray, Mark Fisher, JG Ballard, Jorge Luis Borges, the artist also references a long list of writers who emerged from the ruins of utopia and the revolutionary movements of the 20th century, and the construction of multiple identities that execute themselves in the midst of this cross-reference.

The first gobelin presented by Daniel Guzmán for the exhibition is part of a project that he has carried out for more than three years and was made by the master weavers of the Mexican Gobelin Workshop in Guadalajara. The work is a sample of the narrative techniques and supports with which he intersperses different emotional and temporal nuances within the visual narration of the series.

The series of drawings in the exhibition derives from, like much of his work, the pleasure of reading. The artist uses drawing as a type of language or writing to depict the various stages, the fingerprints and traces that this man has left behind.

The objective of the series is to reconstruct the chapters of a novel, which have been mixed with literature, art, writing, drawing, and the reality of everyday life to shape a story that can become at once fiction, crime novel or cosmic horror.

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